Cattle farm – Brazos Cattle Company http://brazoscattlecompany.com/ Mon, 21 Mar 2022 05:30:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/default.png Cattle farm – Brazos Cattle Company http://brazoscattlecompany.com/ 32 32 Alabama’s Black Belt Cattle Farm Welcomes Birdwatchers and Ecotourism https://brazoscattlecompany.com/alabamas-black-belt-cattle-farm-welcomes-birdwatchers-and-ecotourism-3/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/alabamas-black-belt-cattle-farm-welcomes-birdwatchers-and-ecotourism-3/ [ad_1] The Joe family has farmed 200 acres of land in Alabama’s black belt for three generations, first as a vegetable farm before moving on to herding Black Angus cattle. The family has deep roots in this rich soil near the town of Newbern, and Christopher Joe, 37, doesn’t want that to change. But Joe […]]]>

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The Joe family has farmed 200 acres of land in Alabama’s black belt for three generations, first as a vegetable farm before moving on to herding Black Angus cattle. The family has deep roots in this rich soil near the town of Newbern, and Christopher Joe, 37, doesn’t want that to change.

But Joe also recognizes that farm life isn’t everyone’s life, and some sort of change could be on the horizon as today’s cattle operation is run primarily by his father, Cornelius Joe, a schoolteacher. in retired agro-industry. So, a few years ago, Chris Joe started looking for ways to diversify the family farm.

The plan that emerged – offering birding tours on the property – surprised Joe himself. He was skeptical if it would spark any interest, but it turned out to be an idea that caught on quickly. Joe established Connection with Birds and Nature Tours LLC and staged its first tour in February 2019. Three months later, 130 people showed up for a one-day outing.

“I didn’t think people would pay to do this,” Joe says. “I knew people who were birdwatching, but I just thought they were going to a park or walking around and looking for birds. But people really like these kinds of excursions.

Indeed, according to a 2017 report by the Outdoor Industry Association, more than $30 billion is spent annually on wildlife viewing in the United States, with the majority of that figure coming from bird watching. That’s why it was one of the ideas Brian Rushing suggested with the University of Alabama Economic Development Center when Joe called to discuss possible ways to use the land beyond agriculture.

“He mentioned bird watching as well as horseback riding and ATV riding,” Joe says. “I knew we didn’t want to go horseback riding or mountain biking, but I thought bird watching sounded interesting. Then we had people from AlabamaAudubon to visit us, and they were very excited about it.

That’s because having coordinated birding tours on private property is a rarity in the state, though Rushing says it’s a relatively easy way for rural landowners to generate additional income. .

“It’s very common for private land in Alabama to be used for hunting, but birdwatching is something that has largely been relegated to publicly accessible sites like national forests or state parks,” says Rushing. “It’s an opportunity that most landowners aren’t particularly aware of. Thanks to Chris Joe for recognizing the potential.

Part of the appeal to Joe was that the time and cost to start such a business was limited, which was important since he has a full-time job with the United States Department of Agriculture in the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Joe bought an 18-foot trailer to ferry visitors along the farm’s six miles of groomed trails, installed a few portable toilets, and began offering Saturday tours by appointment. That was basically it. The birds did the rest.

“It’s just natural. It’s nothing we’re trying to manufacture,” says Joe.

Christopher Joe, 37, welcomes birdwatchers to the Black Belt family farm. (Art Meripol / Alabama Affairs)

Indeed, some of the regular livestock operations contribute directly to the ornithological appeal of the farm. For example, when Cornelius Joe cuts grass fields for hay to feed cows, he reveals grasshoppers and dragonflies that provide a tasty meal for raptors such as the swallow-tailed kite.

“The birds will sit in the trees, and before I’m done cutting, they’ll swoop down and start catching the grasshoppers,” says Cornelius Joe. “It’s like ringing the dinner bell and saying, ‘Okay, boys, come in. And then they’re just everywhere. People will take photos of the birds while I’m still driving the tractor.

While this may be the most dramatic action to take place on the property, the farm is also home to a wide variety of other birds that sit serenely in the trees and provide a hissing soundtrack over the land. Chris Joe says the most common varieties are the indigo bunting, summer tanager and prothonotary warbler, along with the occasional bald eagle.

“People will go to different parts of the country at different times of the year looking for certain birds. It’s like a scavenger hunt with animals,” says Joe. “We had bird watchers from New York and California. Once people found out what we were doing here, it just took off.

Rushing says avid birders tend to be older and have lots of free time. As a result, they are often willing to spend money to pursue their hobby.

“Birdwatchers can have a really positive economic impact,” says Rushing. “There are a number of species that birdwatchers want to see that aren’t in their part of the country, so they will travel to see them. They tend to spend a lot of money on accommodation and tourist services.

“What’s really special about Joe’s Farm is that it’s in the Black Belt, which is a traditionally underserved area of ​​Alabama, but it’s an area rich in natural resources. So there are opportunities for nature-based tourism, and this is a great example of that.

Which is important to Chris Joe. After all, Black Belt has been his family’s home for nearly a century, and he wants to do what he can to help both the farm and the region. Last year he held a Black Belt Birding Festival – so successful he plans to expand it to a two-day event this year.

“The main attraction here is the Civil Rights Trail, which brings in people from out of state,” says Joe. “Now they can do it, and then come birding with us, eat in Greensboro, and maybe stay at a B&B.” It’s money that goes into the community and into some of these very poor areas.

“Almost everyone who lived along this road was family. Grandparents, aunts and uncles, cousins. I feel like I did something that would have made them proud.

This story originally appeared in the February 2022 issue of Alabama Business magazine.

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Guernsey Cattle-Focused Naturally Golden Family Farms Cooperative https://brazoscattlecompany.com/guernsey-cattle-focused-naturally-golden-family-farms-cooperative/ https://brazoscattlecompany.com/guernsey-cattle-focused-naturally-golden-family-farms-cooperative/#respond Wed, 14 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/guernsey-cattle-focused-naturally-golden-family-farms-cooperative/ [ad_1] A Guernsey cow peering through a fence. (Farm and dairy file photo) When Vickie Baker started in 4-H around 35 years ago, her parents told her and her three siblings to each choose a breed of dairy cow to show off. The family dairy farm already owned Holsteins. Baker’s parents wanted their children to […]]]>

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A Guernsey cow peering through a fence. (Farm and dairy file photo)

When Vickie Baker started in 4-H around 35 years ago, her parents told her and her three siblings to each choose a breed of dairy cow to show off. The family dairy farm already owned Holsteins. Baker’s parents wanted their children to choose different breeds of cows so they didn’t have to show off against each other.

“In the infinite wisdom of 6 and 7 year olds… I chose Guernsey, because my 4-H neighbors had them,” Baker explained.

This innocent decision was perhaps the first step towards where Baker now stands. She is passionate about the cattle of Guernsey. She has been involved with industry groups, such as the Pennsylvania Guernsey Breeders’ Association and the American Guernsey Association.

About 15 years ago, she and her husband, Mike, bought Guernsey cows from her parents and started Maple Bottom Farm, renting space on her parents’ farm. Five years ago, they bought their own dairy farm in Dawson, PA and moved their cows there. Four years ago, Baker was elected to the board of directors of the American Guernsey Association and then became their treasurer.

“I eat, sleep and kind of breathe Guernsey right now,” Baker said.

Today, Maple Bottom Farm is one of two farms of the new Naturally Golden Family Farms, a cooperative focused on selling dairy products from Guernsey. Although there are only two farms involved so far, they plan to grow and market Guernsey dairy products across Pennsylvania and eventually the country.

“It’s gratifying to know that you are milking cows today and tomorrow… you can eat cheese from the milk you harvested today,” Baker said. “But, in the meantime, a lot of things come into play to make that happen.”

Cooperative

There aren’t many dairies in Guernsey, said Baker, who is the cooperative’s chairman.

“We believe that marketing our milk as American table milk… is one way for us to remain viable in the future,” she said.

The co-op began forming in 2018, with support from the American Guernsey Association, said Cara Itle, of Trotacre Farms, the co-op’s other farm.

Itle, who grew up on the fourth generation dairy farm in Enon Valley, Pa., Was working for the association at this time. The idea was to create a brand and connections with processors for Guernsey dairies.

“We trained him because of our Guernsey cows… and our love for the breed,” she said.

Guernsey milk contains higher percentages of protein, cream, vitamin D and calcium. The milk is golden in color due to the higher amounts of beta-carotene.

Working together allows farms to share responsibilities and bring in people with different expertise. The farms have opted for a cooperative model in order to be able to integrate other farms more easily in the future.

“On the farm, time is the most precious resource,” Baker said. “Some people would say money, but I don’t agree. If I had more time, I could earn more money.

While the cooperative began to be formed in 2018, it only launched its first products at the end of 2020.

“It takes a long time to put into something like that, when you don’t really know exactly where you’re going,” Itle said.

Passionate

Baker worked off the farm for a while in the dairy industry, but after 22 years her job was cut in 2020. Now she works full time on the farm and at the co-op.

“I can honestly say that I miss my clients and what I’ve done, but… I spend all day milking and looking after the cows… and I love it,” she said.

That’s not to say it’s not hard work. Farmers still have other jobs, on or off the farm, in addition to the cooperative. It’s a lot to follow. But it is enriching.

“With niche products, bringing them to market and establishing your own brand, it’s going slower than we’d like,” Baker said.

Pandemic

The pandemic has also upset the plans of the cooperative. They planned to start with milk as a first product by spring or summer 2020.

“We really thought it was a realistic goal, before March [2020]”said Boulanger.

When markets changed and the dairy industry faced transformation challenges, it became clear that this was no longer realistic. The cooperative does not yet bottle milk. But it was able to launch its first cheese products in 2020.

The cooperative had always planned to explore the manufacture and sale of cheese. Guernsey milk tends to have high cheese yields, which makes it a good option for the product. The cooperative signed a letter of intent with Pleasant Lane Creamery for the processing of cheese some time ago. The pandemic has just put this product in the spotlight earlier than expected.

“The good thing about cheese is that it helps us grow the milk market,” Baker said. “This allows us to market in a different way than we thought we had, before the pandemic.”

The cheese makes the cooperative’s brand known. The cooperative mainly sells direct to consumers through online orders, but also works with a few retail outlets.

Itle said the cooperative has enjoyed a lot of community support since its launch, following the general trend of local food support from the pandemic.

“Consumers want to know where their products are coming from and they want to support the local people,” she said.

Collaborate

There are already enough dairy processors in Pennsylvania that it makes sense for the cooperative to work with existing processors instead of starting their own dairy, Itle said.

“It is expensive to go into transformation,” she said. “We wanted to collaborate and work with these processors that have something established.”

Before the pandemic, the cooperative hoped to bring 12 more herds of cattle from Pennsylvania over the next five years. The pandemic caused them to set back that timeline, Baker said. But once the co-op grows with 12 more herds, Baker believes it will be ready to start moving to other states as well.

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Build the Cattle Farm Yule Festival Guide for AC Valhalla https://brazoscattlecompany.com/build-the-cattle-farm-yule-festival-guide-for-ac-valhalla/ https://brazoscattlecompany.com/build-the-cattle-farm-yule-festival-guide-for-ac-valhalla/#respond Fri, 18 Dec 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/build-the-cattle-farm-yule-festival-guide-for-ac-valhalla/ [ad_1] Build Cattle Farm Yule Festival Guide for AC Valhalla / Photo courtesy of Ubisoft Building a breeding farm for the Yule Festival in AC Valhalla is one of the many quests added in the Seasonal Update. The Yule Season Event is slated to last through January. 7, the next update that will follow will […]]]>

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Build Cattle Farm Yule Festival Guide for AC Valhalla / Photo courtesy of Ubisoft

Building a breeding farm for the Yule Festival in AC Valhalla is one of the many quests added in the Seasonal Update. The Yule Season Event is slated to last through January. 7, the next update that will follow will be the “River Raid” update coming in February, making this Christmas event the only major change to come for AC Valhalla for a few months. The Christmas Season Event offers players the chance to unlock Limited Edition Loot using Christmas Tokens which can be obtained by completing Missions. One of those missions is “Cow Catchers” which tasks players with preparing a feast to crown the Yule Festival. Here is a quick guide on how to complete “Cow Catchers”.

Build a cattle farm for the Christmas festival begins in the player’s colony, where you will quickly be notified that cows, which were to be the Christmas feast, have escaped the city. In order to prepare the feast, players will need to build a breeding farm and slaughter all the escaped cows. Fortunately, only four escaped and they are all quite close to the colony. Quest markers will provide an easy guide for the cows, but when in doubt, use the crow to ultimately locate the escaped animals.

After all the cows are slaughtered, the quest will reward players with 140 Christmas Tokens. This is a significant amount of tokens and only 10 tokens to purchase the most expensive cosmetic product available for this event, the “Mdraniht Ceremonial Seax and Shield”. Even for players who don’t want these items, the tokens from this quest can be used to purchase all other Christmas cosmetics combined.

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Kerala: A ‘test tube’ Gir calf born on an indigenous breeding farm | Kochi News https://brazoscattlecompany.com/kerala-a-test-tube-gir-calf-born-on-an-indigenous-breeding-farm-kochi-news/ https://brazoscattlecompany.com/kerala-a-test-tube-gir-calf-born-on-an-indigenous-breeding-farm-kochi-news/#respond Fri, 26 Jun 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/kerala-a-test-tube-gir-calf-born-on-an-indigenous-breeding-farm-kochi-news/ [ad_1] KOCHI: A dairy farm in Vaikkom with 145 indigenous Gir cows, considered the largest of its kind in India, now houses a calf born using in vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo transfer (ET) technology. While there is nothing new in the use of the technology, this is the first time it has been used […]]]>

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KOCHI: A dairy farm in Vaikkom with 145 indigenous Gir cows, considered the largest of its kind in India, now houses a calf born using in vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo transfer (ET) technology. While there is nothing new in the use of the technology, this is the first time it has been used to create a “test tube” Gir calf on a private farm in the state.
While the Aamro Dairies farm, a venture of businessman NRI Murali Nair with investments in aviation logistics and training, took help from JK Bovagenix of the Singhania Group for IVF-ET, they are in the process of developing a laboratory which would offer several farms. facilitated to state farmers, thus increasing the state’s potential to increase the volume and quality of milk. The calf born Thursday was a male and they used an egg collected from a farm in Pune and imported from the Sobero pool in Brazil.
“It would be of great help to the farmers who are trying to develop indigenous breeds in the state. We have entered into a technical collaboration with a Brazilian company that will train our staff. Once that is done, we can offer the facility to everyone. kinds of cattle, ”Murali Nair said. In normal yards, a farmer may dream of having a maximum of eight Gir calves in his life, but with the use of IVF-ET technology, the number can go up to 150 per year.
“When I use egg collection, which can be done every five or six days, I get 30 eggs a month. These eggs, once fertilized in the laboratory, would give you fifteen to twenty good quality embryos. We can produce in one year. 100 to 150 calves per year, ”said Jayadevan Namboothiri, deputy director of the livestock department.
While a Gir cow produces an average of 2,750 to 3,500 liters of milk, offspring from an FIV-ET breeding would produce up to 9,000 liters, which is comparable to exotic breeds like the Holstein.
Murali Nair said when he started in 2018 and planned a small farm with six cows. “I started with Gir, who is one of the best dairy cows in the world because she gives you A2 milk. Now I have 145 cows and a well-developed niche market,” Nair said. Aaamro also offers a diverse range of products, including yogurt, ghee and condensed milk, all derived from A2 milk. “Embryo Transfer ensures that the best genetics are created on our farm. If there are 10 cows on my farm and only two are the best, instead of waiting for this cow to give birth every year, I can create multiple calves. from the same offspring with high milk yield over a shorter period, ”said Murali Nair.
The farm, which offers A2Mate brand products, has facilities for DNA extraction and chromosome mapping of all cows. It also uses polymerase chain reaction (PCR) machines for the identification of viral diseases and near infrared (NIR) technology to assess the quality of silage and feed to avoid the presence of aflatoxins and pesticides.

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