Cattle farm – Brazos Cattle Company http://brazoscattlecompany.com/ Sun, 07 Aug 2022 00:36:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/default.png Cattle farm – Brazos Cattle Company http://brazoscattlecompany.com/ 32 32 Asian long-horned ticks infest SC cattle farm, officials say https://brazoscattlecompany.com/asian-long-horned-ticks-infest-sc-cattle-farm-officials-say/ Fri, 08 Jul 2022 13:52:38 +0000 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/asian-long-horned-ticks-infest-sc-cattle-farm-officials-say/ COLUMBIA, SC (WCBD) – South Carolina’s top health and environment agency announced Friday that it has identified a large population of Asian long-horned ticks infesting a pasture at a York County beef farm. Officials with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control said the invasive tick species is not common in the United […]]]>

COLUMBIA, SC (WCBD) – South Carolina’s top health and environment agency announced Friday that it has identified a large population of Asian long-horned ticks infesting a pasture at a York County beef farm.

Officials with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control said the invasive tick species is not common in the United States. They said bites from these ticks often cause serious illness in people, animals and livestock in other countries.

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports that Asian long-horned ticks were first identified in the United States in 2010 and have since been found in 17 states. A small number of these ticks were identified in South Carolina on shelter dogs in Lancaster and Pickens counties in 2020.

Health officials said Asian long-horned ticks in South Carolina were identified through the state’s tick surveillance program, which they say is a collaborative effort between DHEC, the Arnold University of South Carolina School of Public Health and Clemson University Livestock Poultry Health.

“Although no documented cases of illnesses such as Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, or anaplasmosis have been reported in the United States due to Asian long-horned tick bites, the ability of this species of tick to spread diseases that can make people and animals sick is a concern,” said Dr. Chris Evans, state public health entomologist with DHEC’s Office of Environmental Health Services. “However, Further research is needed in the United States to better understand what diseases the Asian long-horned tick can spread and how much of a risk they pose to the health of people, livestock, and other animals. increasing its populations very rapidly, leading to large infestations in a short period of time, is also of concern.”

Unlike other ticks, a single female Asian long-horned tick can produce 1,000 to 2,000 eggs at a time without mating. This means that a single animal can harbor hundreds or thousands of ticks.

Asian long-horned ticks are light brown in color and tiny. Due to their small size and quick movements, they are difficult to detect. These ticks can feed on any animal, but are commonly found on livestock, dogs, and humans.

Clemson University recommends that livestock owners work with their veterinarian and extension worker to develop a comprehensive tick management plan that includes the use of approved tick control products that can be applied to horses and livestock and in following procedures that reduce ticks in pastures.

Environmental officials have said the Asian long-horned tick is unrelated to the Asian long-horned beetle, which was identified in South Carolina two years ago and prompted a 73-square-mile quarantine zone in Charleston Counties and Dorchester.


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VIDEO: Almost 79 and ok! Ron Borys continues at Cattle Farm – DiscoverWeyburn.com https://brazoscattlecompany.com/video-almost-79-and-ok-ron-borys-continues-at-cattle-farm-discoverweyburn-com-2/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/video-almost-79-and-ok-ron-borys-continues-at-cattle-farm-discoverweyburn-com-2/ If there was ever a “Prairie Tough” list, Ron Borys would be sure to be at the top of that list. Aged 79 in July, Ron continues to herd cattle about 40 kilometers north of Weyburn. As the old saying goes, ‘If you win in the morning, you win the day’, Ron wins every day […]]]>

If there was ever a “Prairie Tough” list, Ron Borys would be sure to be at the top of that list. Aged 79 in July, Ron continues to herd cattle about 40 kilometers north of Weyburn. As the old saying goes, ‘If you win in the morning, you win the day’, Ron wins every day by getting up around 4am to tend around 120 head of cattle.

“The beauty of early mornings is that it’s usually calm, we always seem to get quite a bit of wind in this country, if you get up early in the morning and if there’s going to be calm weather, that’s normally when it’s is,” Ron explained. “Then you hear the birds singing, and it’s so beautiful and peaceful outside, if you appreciate mother nature, you’ll enjoy the mornings more than ever.”

We asked Ron how long he’s been a cattle rancher and what changes he’s seen over time.

“I’ve been milking cows since I was 9, back then, of course, when I was just a young man, it was all just loose hay, everyone said man, you got good big hands, I can tell you. It wasn’t picking my nose,” chuckled Ron. “It was just like that, you worked hard, and you built up a lot of muscle and strength, of course, (referring to himself) which is all gone now.”

As a young man, Ron’s dream was to farm. Around 1963, Ron and his wife Carol moved to the land and began raising their family. While he was excited to actively pursue his dream, achieving his dream meant going through several difficult years.

“I have to thank my parents so much, they let me use their land as collateral to buy my first farm, and we never looked back, it was very difficult the first few years,” Ron shared. “Be sorry I was going to let my parents down because of a decision I made.”

As the 60’s rolled on and determined to honor his financial commitments, Ron was ready to take on one of the toughest laborer jobs there is. Working 16 hour plus day shifts in extreme cold and heat, Ron had now entered what is often referred to as the ‘working man’s playground’, Ron began to grind on the oilfield .

“I ended up working, the highest paying job at the time for a laborer was rough, when I started I was making $1.95 an hour driving a hundred miles one way,” said Ron explained. “It was just the first check, the second check, we got a raise, we ended up getting a 10 cent an hour raise to $2.05, and we thought we had the world by the has **.”

While continuing to farm, the oilfield took Ron overseas.

“In 1971 I went overseas for a job with this oil company for $1500 a month, which was a lot of money, you couldn’t make that kind of money here,” Ron said. “The next posting, they sent me to a big sandbar off the east coast of Canada called Sable Island.” Ron’s work overseas in the oilfield also took him to the Philippines.

Keeping its financial commitments to his parents, the oilfield has helped Ron pay the bills and build a life for his family. He eventually started cultivating 3000 acres and raising up to 300 head of cattle.

We asked Ron what was his fondest memory as a cattle rancher.

“When the kids were home I had given all the kids cattle, let them choose what they wanted, my youngest son had a cow that had triplets, she had five sets of twins and a pair of triplets and she raised all of them, she was an amazing cow, she had only one birth the whole time we had her,” said Ron. “Why her fertility was so much greater in this cow, I have no idea.”

The memory of his son’s cow made tough-guy Ron shed a tear or two.

“I’m quite a sentimental person, most people remember me as a badass, but deep down inside I’m not,” Ron shared.

We asked Ron if he had any words of wisdom to offer young grain and livestock producers.

“You know what, never give up on a dream, I come from a big family, I never thought I would have the chance to cultivate,” Ron shared. “Nothing but perseverance and finally I had a chance in life.”

The long hard work paid off, and now towards their senior years Ron and his wife Carol have a second home in Weyburn and are now renting out their 3000 acres of land. As Ron’s health has started to decline slightly, he is now looking to sell the rest of his cattle this fall and make much needed trips.

“We’re going to do a lot of traveling; we have a daughter in California, and I have an old boyfriend that I met overseas, one of the greatest people I’ve ever met who now lives in Houston, Texas, we’ll usually go around a whole bunch of places in the United States,” Ron explained.


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VIDEO: Almost 79 and ok! Ron Borys continues at Cattle Farm – DiscoverWeyburn.com https://brazoscattlecompany.com/video-almost-79-and-ok-ron-borys-continues-at-cattle-farm-discoverweyburn-com/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/video-almost-79-and-ok-ron-borys-continues-at-cattle-farm-discoverweyburn-com/ If there was ever a “Prairie Tough” list, Ron Borys would be sure to be at the top of that list. Aged 79 in July, Ron continues to herd cattle about 40 kilometers north of Weyburn. As the old saying goes, ‘If you win in the morning, you win the day’, Ron wins every day […]]]>

If there was ever a “Prairie Tough” list, Ron Borys would be sure to be at the top of that list. Aged 79 in July, Ron continues to herd cattle about 40 kilometers north of Weyburn. As the old saying goes, ‘If you win in the morning, you win the day’, Ron wins every day by getting up around 4am to tend around 120 head of cattle.

“The beauty of early mornings is that it’s usually calm, we always seem to get quite a bit of wind in this country, if you get up early in the morning and if there’s going to be calm weather, that’s normally when it’s is,” Ron explained. “Then you hear the birds singing, and it’s so beautiful and peaceful outside, if you appreciate mother nature, you’ll enjoy the mornings more than ever.”

We asked Ron how long he’s been a cattle rancher and what changes he’s seen over time.

“I’ve been milking cows since I was 9, back then, of course, when I was just a young man, it was all just loose hay, everyone said man, you got good big hands, I can tell you. It wasn’t picking my nose,” chuckled Ron. “It was just like that, you worked hard, and you built up a lot of muscle and strength, of course, (referring to himself) which is all gone now.”

As a young man, Ron’s dream was to farm. Around 1963, Ron and his wife Carol moved to the land and began raising their family. While he was excited to actively pursue his dream, achieving his dream meant going through several difficult years.

“I have to thank my parents so much, they let me use their land as collateral to buy my first farm, and we never looked back, it was very difficult the first few years,” Ron shared. “S*** I was going to let my parents down because of a decision I made.”

As the 60’s rolled on and determined to honor his financial commitments, Ron was ready to take on one of the toughest laborer jobs there is. Working 16 hour plus day shifts in extreme cold and heat, Ron had now entered what is often referred to as the ‘working man’s playground’, Ron began to grind on the oilfield .

“I ended up working, the highest paying job at the time for a laborer was rough, when I started I was making $1.95 an hour driving a hundred miles one way,” said explained Ron. “It was just the first check, the second check, we got a raise, we ended up getting a 10 cent an hour raise to $2.05, and we thought we had the world by the has **.”

While continuing to farm, the oilfield took Ron overseas.

“In 1971 I went overseas for a job with this oil company for $1500 a month, which was a lot of money, you couldn’t make that kind of money here,” Ron said. “The next posting, they sent me to a big sandbar off the east coast of Canada called Sable Island.” Ron’s work overseas in the oilfield also took him to the Philippines.

Keeping its financial commitments to his parents, the oilfield has helped Ron pay the bills and build a life for his family. He eventually started cultivating 3000 acres and raising up to 300 head of cattle.

We asked Ron what was his fondest memory as a cattle rancher.

“When the kids were home I had given all the kids cattle, let them choose what they wanted, my youngest son had a cow that had triplets, she had five sets of twins and a pair of triplets and she raised all of them, she was an amazing cow, she had only one birth the whole time we had her,” said Ron. “Why her fertility was so much greater in this cow, I have no idea.”

The memory of his son’s cow brought a tear or two to tough guy Ron.

“I’m quite a sentimental person, most people remember me as a badass, but deep down inside I’m not,” Ron shared.

We asked Ron if he had any words of wisdom to offer young grain and livestock producers.

“You know what, never give up on a dream, I come from a big family, I never thought I would have the chance to cultivate,” Ron shared. “Nothing but perseverance and finally I had a chance in life.”

The long hard work paid off, and now towards their senior years Ron and his wife Carol have a second home in Weyburn and are now renting out their 3000 acres of land. As Ron’s health has started to decline slightly, he is now looking to sell the rest of his cattle this fall and make much needed trips.

“We’re going to do a lot of traveling; we have a daughter in California, and I have an old boyfriend that I met overseas, one of the greatest people I’ve ever met who now lives in Houston, Texas, we’ll usually go around a whole bunch of places in the United States,” Ron explained.


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Former Wealthy Lister Jim Gorman Pays $27 Million for Peabody Beef Farm https://brazoscattlecompany.com/former-wealthy-lister-jim-gorman-pays-27-million-for-peabody-beef-farm/ Sun, 29 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/former-wealthy-lister-jim-gorman-pays-27-million-for-peabody-beef-farm/ Alongside his investments in the mining sector – including a 9.5% stake in ASX-listed Metro Mining Limited – Mr Gorman has an extensive portfolio of Central Queensland cattle farming spanning over 56,000 acres. Since 2015, he has bought more than $38 million worth of cattle properties. Codrilla is the second farm property Mr. Gorman has […]]]>

Alongside his investments in the mining sector – including a 9.5% stake in ASX-listed Metro Mining Limited – Mr Gorman has an extensive portfolio of Central Queensland cattle farming spanning over 56,000 acres. Since 2015, he has bought more than $38 million worth of cattle properties.

Codrilla is the second farm property Mr. Gorman has purchased from Peabody Energy.

In 2015 he bought Seloh Nolem, a 6815 hectare livestock and pasture property also to Valkyrie for $10.25 million.

Mr. Gorman was part of a group of mining entrepreneurs, including the late coal miner Ken Talbot and now wealthy Financial Review auditor Sam Chong, who opened the Jellinbah mine, one of the largest mines in country coal in the Bowen Basin, Queensland.

Mr. Gorman sold his 23.3% stake in the mine in 2007 for $270 million. He appeared on the Rich List financial review in 2009 with a wealth of $210 million.

In 2019, he made a handsome profit on the sale of Eskdale West, a 4,316ha pasture property west of Brisbane, which he sold for $9.8 million, having paid $2.6 million for it in April 2013.

The sale of Codrilla is the second large former mining site to be returned to the agricultural sector this year.

In January, twelve local farming families and an offshore business buyer acquired Chinese miner Shenhua’s former Watermark coal mine site near Gunnedah – an aggregation of 16,500 ha – for $120 million.

Alongside the sale of Codrilla, Albertina, a 2,117ha cattle ranching estate in Ashford, in the NSW Northern Tablelands, sold for $7.6million last week at auction to a family with grazing interests.

Albertina came with seven kilometers of frontage on the River Severn.

Albertina, which includes seven kilometers of frontage on the River Severn, had been owned for 25 years by Graeme and Lorraine Olley. Bruce Birch and Andrew Starr of Ray White Rural NSW marketed Albertina.


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The cattle never judged me, so I never judged the cattle https://brazoscattlecompany.com/the-cattle-never-judged-me-so-i-never-judged-the-cattle/ Thu, 05 May 2022 05:00:41 +0000 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/the-cattle-never-judged-me-so-i-never-judged-the-cattle/ Although I spent every day of my Southern Illinois youth on what was at the time a very large dairy farm, I never really had a clue what made a cow or a calf Holstein better or worse than the next Holstein cow or calf. Much of that inability lay in my complete disinterest in […]]]>

Although I spent every day of my Southern Illinois youth on what was at the time a very large dairy farm, I never really had a clue what made a cow or a calf Holstein better or worse than the next Holstein cow or calf.

Much of that inability lay in my complete disinterest in showing off a calf, heifer, or cow at the 4-H county fair. The reason was selfishly simple: since the fair always seemed to be scheduled on the hottest, steamiest day of summer, nothing – whether animal, vegetable or mineral – wanted to be there, so why should I ever want to be there?

This disinterest, however, did not stop me from trying to join the county 4-H dairy judging team. In fact, it spurred me on because on the spring Saturday of the multi-county judging event to winnow the talent (and my older brother, Richard, was a real talent) of posers like me, it also promised lunch at the only McDonald’s in southern Illinois. .

What 11-year-old farm boy wouldn’t have endured three hours of manure-splattered cows to take advantage of this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity? And, yes, the first bite of my very first McDonald’s fries that day remains a knee-shaking memory.

Completely ignorant

But it also left me blissfully unaware of what “confirmation” means in reference to any animal, where exactly I should fix my gaze to examine a cow’s “topline”, or that “hock” was a noun referring to an animal’s foot, not a verb suggesting a visit to a pawnshop.

My father, a lifelong dairy farmer, never offered a single glimpse of cow meat grading despite his annual purchase of six to 10 promising, pregnant heifers. One day he had simply gone “to get heifers”, and the next day a flatbed truck arrived to unload his purchases. All were black and white, all had four legs and four teats, and all were added to the herd without a word of explanation. (Richard watched everyone intently.)

Selection of favorites

However, my lack of interest, talent, or training in judging has never stopped me from picking favorites from the herd. One, which my brother David and I adored, was simply “22”, the number engraved on the brass tag hanging by a chain around his neck.

We didn’t love her for her beauty or her buttery fatness, but because she was a round-bellied pet we could climb on, under and at any time. We could even lie on her broad back while she stood, slowly chewing alfalfa hay with complete satisfaction. She was a perfect, silent friend.

Another animal, labeled 52, had a name: Dyna. The name was for no one; it was the shortened version of her full name, Dynamite, the insight you needed to milk her without losing your right arm. Dyna was the most kicked and abused cow we had ever had on the farm, but she was earning more than her keep, so she stayed – just like our bruised forearms and deflated egos.

Even the farm’s longtime shepherd, Howard, the sweetest soul to ever walk into a milking parlour, didn’t like Dyna. And who could blame him for that; Dyna had two chances a day, six days a week, to cut it. On the seventh, Howard healed.

All business

My dad wasn’t sentimental about a cow or a heifer or a farm dog. If, as he often said about first calf heifers, “Put more on your back than in the bucket,” she got a quick ticket to one of our two basement freezers.

If the Dairy Herd Improvement Association’s monthly records showed a cow slacking, slipping or slowing in production, a bent eye greeted her every visit to the milking parlour.

And he never forgot the slackers or the sliders. If they took one more step in the wrong direction – didn’t breed, jump a fence or give someone a hard time in the living room – they were in the next truck to the National Stockyards at East St. Louis, Illinois, and, I later discovered, to my horror, the nearest McDonald’s.

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Warrenbayne Cattle Farm achieves carbon neutrality https://brazoscattlecompany.com/warrenbayne-cattle-farm-achieves-carbon-neutrality/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 12:26:37 +0000 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/warrenbayne-cattle-farm-achieves-carbon-neutrality/ Trees are the key: Russell Washusen, farmer from Warrenbayne, has achieved carbon neutrality in his cattle farming. Photo by contribution The sign has published several articles in recent months about the obstacles faced by cattle farmers when trying to become carbon neutral. The journey to carbon neutrality is not easy given the amount produced by […]]]>

Trees are the key: Russell Washusen, farmer from Warrenbayne, has achieved carbon neutrality in his cattle farming. Photo by contribution

The sign has published several articles in recent months about the obstacles faced by cattle farmers when trying to become carbon neutral.

The journey to carbon neutrality is not easy given the amount produced by livestock and the challenges faced in a region with limited rainfall.

However, a Warrenbayne farmer, Mr Russell Washusen, has solved the riddle and his farm is officially listed as carbon neutral.

He is hosting a field day on May 7 where he will discuss his journey to carbon neutrality and how he got there.

Mr. Washusen said it was not a quick process, but it was doable.

“After the 1982 drought, we started planting trees, which was to control soil erosion along the creek,” Washusen said.

“After this drought, there was a very big change in the way the water was flowing.

“The land was overgrazed and when the rains came in ’83 we noticed a real change in the behavior of the stream banks.”

To solve the problem, Mr. Washusen fenced off the creek and started planting trees.

“We thought it was temporary, but it’s pretty permanent now and we rarely let the cattle graze,” he said.

“We found that we needed to start making better use of the pastures on either side of the creek.

“So in the late 90s we started planting pine trees because they were cheap and grew in Benalla.

“We then looked at local markets in the North East and Forestry Australian in Myrtleford used a type of pruned pine for face veneers at the time.

“These are the most valuable pins you can have when they get to the right size.”

Mr Washusen said the farm diversified further following the wool market crash of the early 1990s.

“So we got into forestry and expanded those plantations and planted about 6.5 or 7 more hectares of pines.

“We also put in hardwoods, (some) blue gums, spotted gums and a few other species, and we handled them the same way.”

The other effect of the wool market crash was that Mr. Washusen also had to find additional employment to make ends meet.

“I ended up at CSIRO,” he said.

“And I did a doctorate. As a research scientist, I examined the trees we grew at Warrenbayne.

“And we looked at how best to use them. We found that there are actually many species that are suitable for agricultural forestry.

“And we looked to use a lot of them for their high-value wood, to give the best return to producers.

“So I’ve been involved for 17 to 18 years in this research.”

Mr. Washusen retired from CSIRO in 2009 and has since worked full-time in agriculture.

“Now I have over 40 years of experience growing trees,” he said.

“The sheep and beef industries have an ambitious Meat and Livestock Australia (MLA) target of becoming carbon neutral by 2030.

“Part of my research focused on the accumulation of carbon in trees as a by-product.

“So knowing well the accumulation of carbon in trees, I called MLA last year and started discussing agricultural forestry as a way to sequester carbon.”

Mr Washusen said the University of Melbourne had developed carbon accounting tools as part of its role as a research provider for MLA.

“Richard Eckard (Professor of Sustainable Agriculture at the University of Melbourne) is the mastermind behind the carbon accounting tools,” he said.

“And (Professor) Rodert Keenen runs the Trees on Farm program for the University of Melbourne.”

Mr Washusen said his farm was one of the first in Australia to use the tools it had developed to operate a high forestry farming operation.

“I had a bit of trouble getting started, but we managed to get there,” he said.

“When I did our first carbon footprint I found out we were carbon neutral, we had grown enough trees to become carbon neutral.”

Mr Washusen is hosting a field day at his Warrenbayne farm on May 7 to help other farmers achieve carbon neutrality.

This is a free event, but those interested will need to register to attend.

For more information and to register, go to www.mla.com.au/news-and-events/events-and-workshops/carbon-neutral-cattle-production-in-northeast-victoria–field-day


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Warrenbayne Cattle Farm achieves carbon neutrality https://brazoscattlecompany.com/warrenbayne-cattle-farm-achieves-carbon-neutrality-2/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 12:26:37 +0000 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/warrenbayne-cattle-farm-achieves-carbon-neutrality-2/ Trees are the key: Russell Washusen, farmer from Warrenbayne, has achieved carbon neutrality in his cattle farming. Photo by contribution The sign has published several articles in recent months about the obstacles faced by cattle farmers when trying to become carbon neutral. The journey to carbon neutrality is not easy given the amount produced by […]]]>

Trees are the key: Russell Washusen, farmer from Warrenbayne, has achieved carbon neutrality in his cattle farming. Photo by contribution

The sign has published several articles in recent months about the obstacles faced by cattle farmers when trying to become carbon neutral.

The journey to carbon neutrality is not easy given the amount produced by livestock and the challenges faced in a region with limited rainfall.

However, a Warrenbayne farmer, Mr Russell Washusen, has solved the riddle and his farm is officially listed as carbon neutral.

He is hosting a field day on May 7 where he will discuss his journey to carbon neutrality and how he got there.

Mr. Washusen said it was not a quick process, but it was doable.

“After the 1982 drought, we started planting trees, which was to control soil erosion along the creek,” Washusen said.

“After this drought, there was a very big change in the way the water was flowing.

“The land was overgrazed and when the rains came in ’83 we noticed a real change in the behavior of the stream banks.”

To solve the problem, Mr. Washusen fenced off the creek and started planting trees.

“We thought it was temporary, but it’s pretty permanent now and we rarely let the cattle graze,” he said.

“We found that we needed to start making better use of the pastures on either side of the creek.

“So in the late 90s we started planting pine trees because they were cheap and grew in Benalla.

“We then looked at local markets in the North East and Forestry Australian in Myrtleford used a type of pruned pine for face veneers at the time.

“These are the most valuable pins you can have when they get to the right size.”

Mr Washusen said the farm diversified further following the wool market crash of the early 1990s.

“So we got into forestry and expanded those plantations and planted about 6.5 or 7 more hectares of pines.

“We also put in hardwoods, (some) blue gums, spotted gums and a few other species, and we handled them the same way.”

The other effect of the wool market crash was that Mr. Washusen also had to find additional employment to make ends meet.

“I ended up at CSIRO,” he said.

“And I did a doctorate. As a research scientist, I examined the trees we grew at Warrenbayne.

“And we looked at how best to use them. We found that there are actually many species that are suitable for agricultural forestry.

“And we looked to use a lot of them for their high-value wood, to give the best return to producers.

“So I’ve been involved for 17 to 18 years in this research.”

Mr. Washusen retired from CSIRO in 2009 and has since worked full-time in agriculture.

“Now I have over 40 years of experience growing trees,” he said.

“The sheep and beef industries have an ambitious Meat and Livestock Australia (MLA) target of becoming carbon neutral by 2030.

“Part of my research focused on the accumulation of carbon in trees as a by-product.

“So knowing well the accumulation of carbon in trees, I called MLA last year and started discussing agricultural forestry as a way to sequester carbon.”

Mr Washusen said the University of Melbourne had developed carbon accounting tools as part of its role as a research provider for MLA.

“Richard Eckard (Professor of Sustainable Agriculture at the University of Melbourne) is the mastermind behind the carbon accounting tools,” he said.

“And (Professor) Rodert Keenen runs the Trees on Farm program for the University of Melbourne.”

Mr Washusen said his farm was one of the first in Australia to use the tools it had developed to operate a high forestry farming operation.

“I had a bit of trouble getting started, but we managed to get there,” he said.

“When I did our first carbon footprint I found out we were carbon neutral, we had grown enough trees to become carbon neutral.”

Mr Washusen is hosting a field day at his Warrenbayne farm on May 7 to help other farmers achieve carbon neutrality.

This is a free event, but those interested will need to register to attend.

For more information and to register, go to www.mla.com.au/news-and-events/events-and-workshops/carbon-neutral-cattle-production-in-northeast-victoria–field-day


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Local cattle farming strives to be environmentally friendly https://brazoscattlecompany.com/local-cattle-farming-strives-to-be-environmentally-friendly/ Sat, 16 Apr 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/local-cattle-farming-strives-to-be-environmentally-friendly/ PERSPECTIVE, Ky. — Ragsdale Sutherland Shorthorns has been raising cattle for 50 years in Prospect, Ky. What do you want to know Ragsdale Sutherland Shorthorns have been raising cattle for 50 years Kentucky ranks 8th in the nation for the number of beef cows on farms USDA recently committed $215 million to support expansion of […]]]>

PERSPECTIVE, Ky. — Ragsdale Sutherland Shorthorns has been raising cattle for 50 years in Prospect, Ky.


What do you want to know

  • Ragsdale Sutherland Shorthorns have been raising cattle for 50 years
  • Kentucky ranks 8th in the nation for the number of beef cows on farms
  • USDA recently committed $215 million to support expansion of meat and poultry processing options

“Well I grew up on a farm, my dad ran farms for the Brown family here in Prospect affiliated with the Brown Forman distillery and I think there were four different farms,” ​​said David Ragsdale, a breeder of Ragsdale Sutherland Shorthorns.

According to the University of California Davis, cattle are the largest agricultural source of greenhouse gases in the world. These researchers say that each year a cow will cough up 220 pounds of methane.

A group of nearly 50 cows at Ragsdale Sutherland Shorthorn Farm in Prospect. (Spectrum News 1/Erin Wilson)

“Everyone thought photosynthesis didn’t have much to do with agriculture, but it has everything to do with agriculture,” Ragsdale said. “If we rotate them and retain water on the property and plant trees and do other things, I think we can benefit.”

Ragsdale’s goal is to offset methane levels by rotating his herd of 50 cows every 10 days and making their feed easier to digest.

“We have a grass-based product that we feed with non-GMO corn and soybean meal. Most of the products we use in livestock supplementation are non-GMO, so they haven’t been sprayed with Roundup,” Ragsdale said.

Between showing cattle and selling beef, Ragsdale doesn’t have much downtime. He also knows there is a need for more local beef processors.

“We would like to do more, but the processors are supported and I understand their dilemma. A lot of them are running out of help and more and more people are processing beef,” Ragsdale said. “I think 880,000 head of cattle last year in the United States were processed by local processors more than the year before.”

Kentucky ranks 8th in the country for the number of beef cows on farms, thanks in part to its climate.

“We don’t really have very bad weather,” Ragsdale said. “We have a few storms, we have a few cold snaps, but generally we can raise cattle on grass nine to ten months a year. If we do it well, we can do it all year round.

the USDA recently committed $215 million to support the expansion of meat and poultry processing options. Cattle also accounted for $1 billion in sales, ranking second behind poultry.


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Local cattle farming strives to be environmentally friendly https://brazoscattlecompany.com/local-cattle-farming-strives-to-be-environmentally-friendly-2/ Sat, 16 Apr 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/local-cattle-farming-strives-to-be-environmentally-friendly-2/ PERSPECTIVE, Ky. — Ragsdale Sutherland Shorthorns has been raising cattle for 50 years in Prospect, Ky. What do you want to know Ragsdale Sutherland Shorthorns have been raising cattle for 50 years Kentucky ranks 8th in the nation for the number of beef cows on farms USDA recently committed $215 million to support expansion of […]]]>

PERSPECTIVE, Ky. — Ragsdale Sutherland Shorthorns has been raising cattle for 50 years in Prospect, Ky.


What do you want to know

  • Ragsdale Sutherland Shorthorns have been raising cattle for 50 years
  • Kentucky ranks 8th in the nation for the number of beef cows on farms
  • USDA recently committed $215 million to support expansion of meat and poultry processing options

“Well I grew up on a farm, my dad ran farms for the Brown family here in Prospect affiliated with the Brown Forman distillery and I think there were four different farms,” ​​said David Ragsdale, a breeder of Ragsdale Sutherland Shorthorns.

According to the University of California Davis, cattle are the largest agricultural source of greenhouse gases in the world. These researchers say that each year a cow will cough up 220 pounds of methane.

A group of nearly 50 cows at Ragsdale Sutherland Shorthorn Farm in Prospect. (Spectrum News 1/Erin Wilson)

“Everyone thought photosynthesis didn’t have much to do with agriculture, but it has everything to do with agriculture,” Ragsdale said. “If we rotate them and retain water on the property and plant trees and do other things, I think we can benefit.”

Ragsdale’s goal is to offset methane levels by rotating his herd of 50 cows every 10 days and making their feed easier to digest.

“We have a grass-based product that we feed with non-GMO corn and soybean meal. Most of the products we use in livestock supplementation are non-GMO, so they haven’t been sprayed with Roundup,” Ragsdale said.

Between showing cattle and selling beef, Ragsdale doesn’t have much downtime. He also knows there is a need for more local beef processors.

“We would like to do more, but the processors are supported and I understand their dilemma. A lot of them are running out of help and more and more people are processing beef,” Ragsdale said. “I think 880,000 head of cattle last year in the United States were processed by local processors more than the year before.”

Kentucky ranks 8th in the country for the number of beef cows on farms, thanks in part to its climate.

“We don’t really have very bad weather,” Ragsdale said. “We have a few storms, we have a few cold spells, but generally we can raise cattle on grass nine to ten months a year. If we do it well, we can do it all year round.

the USDA recently committed $215 million to support the expansion of meat and poultry processing options. Cattle also accounted for $1 billion in sales, ranking second behind poultry.


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‘Just grateful’: Cattle farm damaged by Friday morning storms https://brazoscattlecompany.com/just-grateful-cattle-farm-damaged-by-friday-morning-storms/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/just-grateful-cattle-farm-damaged-by-friday-morning-storms/ COUNTY OF ESCAMBIA, Ala. (WKRG) – Extensive damage was left at Perdido River Farms near Atmore on Friday as severe weather spread through the area. John English, the farm’s general manager, said severe storms destroyed the farm’s equipment and hay barns. Five Flag Speedway cancels Friday events for opening weekend Trucks were seen stuck under […]]]>

COUNTY OF ESCAMBIA, Ala. (WKRG) – Extensive damage was left at Perdido River Farms near Atmore on Friday as severe weather spread through the area.

John English, the farm’s general manager, said severe storms destroyed the farm’s equipment and hay barns.

Trucks were seen stuck under the collapsed tin roof of the equipment barn. Tin was thrown around the property.

On the other side of Poarch Road, a hay barn was also destroyed. Tin was seen wrapped around fences.

The damage cannot be repaired, said English, but luckily no one was injured. The farm workers had the day off due to this risk of severe weather. English said it could have been worse.

“Once I got here to observe and check on what was going on, it was pretty devastating with the amount of damage we took to the hay and equipment barns,” English said. “We have trucks that appear to be under the barns. I was very surprised, but grateful for who we work for. They were able to let us down to the travel desks today so no one was harmed or hurt here. Just grateful.

English said no livestock were harmed during the storms.


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