Cattle production – Brazos Cattle Company http://brazoscattlecompany.com/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 20:15:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/default.png Cattle production – Brazos Cattle Company http://brazoscattlecompany.com/ 32 32 Bovine Respiratory Disease Treatment Market – Increase in bovine production due to increasing demand from manufacturers is expected to drive market growth https://brazoscattlecompany.com/bovine-respiratory-disease-treatment-market-increase-in-bovine-production-due-to-increasing-demand-from-manufacturers-is-expected-to-drive-market-growth/ https://brazoscattlecompany.com/bovine-respiratory-disease-treatment-market-increase-in-bovine-production-due-to-increasing-demand-from-manufacturers-is-expected-to-drive-market-growth/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 11:21:47 +0000 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/bovine-respiratory-disease-treatment-market-increase-in-bovine-production-due-to-increasing-demand-from-manufacturers-is-expected-to-drive-market-growth/ Bovine respiratory disease is the most common disease in cattle, affecting the lower respiratory system and producing bronchopneumonia which can lead to death. It is a multifactorial syndrome triggered by the association of a viral infection and a bacterial agent, amplified by stress. Mannheimia hemolytica, Pasteurella multocida and Hemophilus somnus are among the bacteria responsible […]]]>

Bovine respiratory disease is the most common disease in cattle, affecting the lower respiratory system and producing bronchopneumonia which can lead to death. It is a multifactorial syndrome triggered by the association of a viral infection and a bacterial agent, amplified by stress. Mannheimia hemolytica, Pasteurella multocida and Hemophilus somnus are among the bacteria responsible for bovine respiratory disease, as are viral agents such as bovine viral diarrhea (BVD), infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR), parainfluenza virus type 3 ( PI-3), and bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV).

The global bovine respiratory disease treatment market is expected to grow as beef production increases in response to increasing demand for animal meat.

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According to a 2016 study published in the Turkish Journal of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the most common disease in cattle, contributing around 75% of morbidity and more than 50% of deaths from cows. In the near future, the increasing prevalence of BRD in cattle is expected to propel the growth of the global bovine respiratory disease treatment market.

Beef production is one of the most important industries in the United States, according to a study released by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) in 2016. It was valued at US $ 78.2 billion in 2015. As the population increases, the need for cow meat and dairy products, which accelerates the pace of cattle farming. Inadvertently, increased cow husbandry increases the prevalence of BRD in cattle. In the near future, this is expected to create a favorable atmosphere for the growth of the global bovine respiratory disease treatment market.

The global bovine respiratory disease treatment market is divided into three categories: disease, treatment type, and distribution channel.

Due to the increasing prevalence of bovine respiratory disease, North America is expected to account for the largest share of the global bovine respiratory disease treatment market.

Due to the increasing prevalence of bovine respiratory disease in the region, North America is expected to dominate the bovine respiratory disease treatment market. Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is a global health problem that is most common in cattle in North America, according to the 2014 Symposium on Bovine Respiratory Diseases.

In the United States, BRD is responsible for 70-80% of all feedlot morbidity and 40-50% of all deaths. Due to the increase in cattle breeding in China, the Bovine Respiratory Disease market in Asia-Pacific is expected to experience substantial growth. According to a report released in 2017 by the US Department of Agriculture, China is the world’s second-largest exporter of beef.

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The increasing development of innovative treatment methods for bovine respiratory diseases is expected to drive the growth of the global bovine respiratory disease treatment market during the forecast period

The major players operating in the global bovine respiratory disease treatment market are Bimeda Animal Health, Elanco, Virbac Group, Bayer AG, Zoetis Inc., Merck & Co. Inc., Boehringer Ingelheim GmbH and Vetoquinol.

Bayer launched in 2015, the immunostimulant Zelnate, a treatment for bovine respiratory disease (BRD) that successfully reduces BRD-related death and lung injury in cattle. The US Department of Agriculture has approved Zelnate, the first immunostimulant based on the cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) motif.

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• Identify current trends and expected growth over the next nine years

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• To drive research-based business decisions and add weight to presentations and marketing strategies

• Acquire competitive knowledge of the main market players

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Contents

Global Bovine Respiratory Disease Treatment Market Research Report

Section 1: Global Bovine Respiratory Disease Treatment Industry Overview
Section 2: Global economic impact on the bovine respiratory disease treatment industry
Section 3: Competition in the world market by industry producers
Section 4: World productions, income (value), by region
Article 5: Global supply (production), consumption, export, import, geographically
Article 6: World productions, income (value), price trend, product type
Article 7: Global market analysis, based on the application
Article 8: Bovine Respiratory Disease Treatment Market Price Analysis
Article 9: Market chain, sourcing strategy and downstream buyers
Article 10: Key strategies and policies of distributors / suppliers / traders
Article 11: Analysis of the key marketing strategy, by market suppliers
Article 12: Analysis of market effect factors
Article 13: Global Bovine Respiratory Disease Treatment Market Forecast

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Ilocos Norte town switches to livestock production https://brazoscattlecompany.com/ilocos-norte-town-switches-to-livestock-production/ https://brazoscattlecompany.com/ilocos-norte-town-switches-to-livestock-production/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/ilocos-norte-town-switches-to-livestock-production/ CATTLE PRODUCTION. Pig farmers in Ilocos Norte are now turning to beef and goat production as African swine fever (ASF) continues to threaten their livelihoods. In Piddig, Ilocos Norte, the local government unit has partnered with various government agencies to provide livelihood assistance to affected residents. (Contribution photo) CITY OF LAOAG – As African swine […]]]>

CATTLE PRODUCTION. Pig farmers in Ilocos Norte are now turning to beef and goat production as African swine fever (ASF) continues to threaten their livelihoods. In Piddig, Ilocos Norte, the local government unit has partnered with various government agencies to provide livelihood assistance to affected residents. (Contribution photo)

CITY OF LAOAG – As African swine fever (ASF) continues to threaten the livelihoods of local pig farmers in the province, some residents here are now turning to other animal production to survive the pandemic.

In the town of Piddig, several residents are now engaged in livestock production as they get rid of their fattening pigs before they get infected.

In support of backyard breeders, the municipal government led by Mayor Eduardo “Eddie” Guillen recently distributed at least 20 cows and 77 carabaos to farmers.

In partnership with government technicians who are experts in artificial insemination, the municipal government also values ​​the native cows of local farmers with “Wagyu», A Japanese breed of cattle.

According to Guillen, they plan to produce around 2,000 Wagyu cows every year. Wagyu cows cost between PHP 30,000 and PHP 50,000 each.

“This is another convergence project between the Piddig government, the Department of Agriculture, the Bureau of Animal Industry and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources,” he said. in an interview on Tuesday.

In anticipation of ASF entering the region and avoiding the mass slaughter of pigs, Guillen said the municipality has allocated PHP 900,000 from its calamity fund for the purchase of pigs from small pig farmers. of the region.

“What we did was like killing two birds with one stone,” Guillen said as pork was added to the relief kits they were distributing to every household during these difficult times.

Besides pork, each household also received rice and groceries courtesy of municipal and barangay units.

Currently, ASF has already been detected in Dingras, Marcos, Solsona, Vintar, Carasi, Nueva Era, Banna, Laoag and San Nicolas while local authorities are closely monitoring its buffer zones or neighboring municipalities. (ANP)


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United States Prepares Ground for Successful Beef Cattle Production | Agriculture https://brazoscattlecompany.com/united-states-prepares-ground-for-successful-beef-cattle-production-agriculture/ https://brazoscattlecompany.com/united-states-prepares-ground-for-successful-beef-cattle-production-agriculture/#respond Wed, 01 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/united-states-prepares-ground-for-successful-beef-cattle-production-agriculture/ The abundant forage growth and proximity to row crop feed sources set the stage for successful beef production in some Midwestern states, and the beef industry people in those states are proud of their success. Dave Patterson, a chancellor’s professor in the Animal Sciences Division at the University of Missouri, says cattle producers in these […]]]>

The abundant forage growth and proximity to row crop feed sources set the stage for successful beef production in some Midwestern states, and the beef industry people in those states are proud of their success.

Dave Patterson, a chancellor’s professor in the Animal Sciences Division at the University of Missouri, says cattle producers in these states benefit from proximity to animal feed, including ethanol plant by-products such as distillery grains.

“I think that’s one of the big benefits of animal production in the Midwest,” he says.

According to the USDA, in 2021, Missouri has the third highest number of beef cows in the country, at 2.035 million, behind Texas and Oklahoma. Iowa is 13th in the United States with 890,000 beef cows. Illinois ranks 26th, with 356,000 beef cows.

Patterson says growing forage is the key to being able to raise lots of cattle.

“A lot of that is the forage base, the formidable forage base of the state,” he says. “In a normal year, there is the expected annual rainfall to allow grazing. “

Even in the drier years, Patterson says the availability of byproduct foods allows for more options.

Jim Humphrey, a breeding specialist at the University of Missouri who raises cattle in northwestern Missouri, says Missouri’s climate can also be useful for raising cattle.

“Our climate, we don’t get extremely hot like the Southeast, and we don’t get extremely cold like the North,” he says.

He also says Missouri has a wide variety of terrain and the ranching operations south of Interstate 70 may be different from those in the north, with rocky soil and rolling hills to the south.

But the consistent theme of successful beef production areas is that of quality cattle producers.

“You have to be laudatory to the producers,” says Humphrey. “They are doing a good job.”

Patterson is working with MU’s Show-Me Select heifer replacement program, and he says producers in Missouri have been working to make advancements in genetics, building their herds.

“There has been a lot of emphasis on genetic improvements in the condition,” he says.

Of course, the state’s fescue can present toxicity issues during the hot summer months. But Patterson says growers can manage this by having forage diversity in the pastures and supplementing fescue with other feed sources when toxicity is high.

“The fescue is our biggest obstacle that we have here, along with the endophyte,” says Humphrey.

He says Missouri has a long history as a major breeding state.

“St. Joe and Kansas City were big beef cow towns,” he says.

The towns were home to large stockyards and are still home to some headquarters of cattle breeding associations.

Humphrey says that Missouri’s neighbor to the north of Iowa is also a major livestock-producing state, with great access to affordable corn-based foods and food byproducts. He says total rainfall in the Midwest can be a hindrance to feeding livestock, but Iowa makes it work, taking advantage of the state’s fertile land.

“You can get by without breaking the bank,” he says. “You cross the line way back into Iowa, they start feeding the cattle.”

Dr Ngozi Ezike, director of the Illinois Department of Public Health, talks about the state’s COVID-19 outbreak and the stress on hospitals, especially in southern and central Illinois.



Teresa Steckler, an extension educator at the University of Illinois, says her state also has some advantages as a cattle-producing state, including the state’s prowess in row crop production.

“One of the biggest factors is the fact that we have a lot of cheap corn,” she says.

Similar to Missouri, Steckler says Illinois has some areas that are better suited for animal production, including its region in southern Illinois.

“We have hilly areas that are not suitable for row crops, but they are good for livestock,” she says.

Steckler says one of the challenges for Illinois cattle producers is competition for land and land costs. When older producers leave the business and families rent land, it is often converted to row crops. Market fluctuations can also be a challenge.

Steckler says cattle ranchers take pride in their industry no matter what state they find themselves in.

“When they’re at the fair, they’re proud when their granddaughter is there, interested in (raising cattle),” she says.

She says beef producers like to do their part to make the United States the world’s leading supplier of beef. No matter what state they find themselves in, they know they are part of something bigger, of a way of life.

“Like cattle ranchers across the United States, they take pride in what they do,” Steckler says of cattle ranchers in his state.


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Cattle production on a downward trajectory :: Mmegi Online https://brazoscattlecompany.com/cattle-production-on-a-downward-trajectory-mmegi-online/ https://brazoscattlecompany.com/cattle-production-on-a-downward-trajectory-mmegi-online/#respond Fri, 20 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/cattle-production-on-a-downward-trajectory-mmegi-online/ The results of the latest survey produced by Statistics Botswana indicate that the cattle herd has increased from 1.3 million in 2015 to 1.1 million in 2017 due to an increase in the number of cattle lost to stray animals and theft. of cattle. In 2017, approximately 83,901 cattle were lost compared to 8,571 recorded […]]]>

The results of the latest survey produced by Statistics Botswana indicate that the cattle herd has increased from 1.3 million in 2015 to 1.1 million in 2017 due to an increase in the number of cattle lost to stray animals and theft. of cattle. In 2017, approximately 83,901 cattle were lost compared to 8,571 recorded in 2015 due to these two factors.

The report further pointed out that the birth rate of cattle fell from 57.9% to 50.5% during the reference period, which may also have contributed to the reduction of the cattle population in 2017. The Cattle mortality rate also decreased from 7.1% to 6.2% and the exploitation rate from 6.6. % to 5.7% between 2015 and 2017 respectively.

“This implies that there is a reduction in livestock deaths that could be attributed to good agricultural practices. Cattle take rates fell from 6.6 percent in 2015 to 5.7 percent in 2017, indicating a decline in cattle sales during this period. It is possible to improve the performance of cattle farming in the traditional sector by improving both birth and exploitation rates and by reducing mortality rates, ”the report says.

The cattle herd has grown steadily since 2007, after a five-year decline from a peak of three million head in 2002. The cattle industry, which is the economic backbone of most rural people, has already been hit hard by the foot-and-mouth disease epidemic. Disease that increased livestock death rates, leading to a decrease in the cattle herd from 2.63 million in 2010 to 2.55 million in 2011. At the time, the government was forced to slaughter and quarantine beasts from affected areas.

However, the Economic Union Partnership Agreement (EPA) between the Southern African Development Community (SADC) and the European Union (EU) also appears to have created momentum for pastoralist communities. from Botswana for export-oriented livestock. The EPA gives Botswana, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia and Swaziland duty-free and quota-free access to the European market. The new SADC-EU EPA framework, which entered into force in October last year, is gradually bearing fruit as most livestock keepers are already exploiting it. Thanks to the EU agreement, Botswana exports beef without tariffs or quotas to the EU.

Regarding beef exports, since last year around 9,000 tonnes of beef exports from the Botswana Meat Commission (BMC) have been sold each year in the lucrative EU market, including 1,600 tonnes are sent to Norway under a quota agreement. The second largest BMC market after the EU is South Africa, where the parastatal company exports 14,000 tonnes of beef per year. The other markets are Angola, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Mozambique, Hong Kong, Thailand, Kuwait and Ghana. The Chinese market is also lucrative as they want both red and green offal such as tripe to name a few. A few years ago, BMC secured supplies to the Vietnamese market where it ships 50 tonnes (two containers per week).

At the same time, during the period under review, the goat population increased from 1.1 million in 2015 to 1.2 million in 2017, although the birth rate fell from 43.6% to 39.3%. The goat death rate also increased significantly, from 16.7 percent to 22.9 percent during the same period. However, the goat harvest rate improved from 7.1% to 7.3% between the two seasons.

The sheep population also increased from 214,234 to 242,600 between 2015 and 2017. Nevertheless, sheep experienced a decline in the birth rate from 36.7% to 33.6% during the review period, while the death rate rose to 15.9% in 2017, compared to 11.7% recorded in 2015. The levy has decreased considerably, from 6.2% in 2015 to 4.1% in 2017.


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Summit Lake Livestock converts barns for livestock production https://brazoscattlecompany.com/summit-lake-livestock-converts-barns-for-livestock-production/ https://brazoscattlecompany.com/summit-lake-livestock-converts-barns-for-livestock-production/#respond Thu, 08 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/summit-lake-livestock-converts-barns-for-livestock-production/ WILMONT, Minn. – When brothers Russ and Brian Penning started Summit Lake Livestock about 15 years ago, they did so to start the largest Penning Farms operation on their own south-east of Wilmont. The two began by purchasing day-old bottle Holstein calves and as the business grew they renovated several vacant pigsties on the site […]]]>

WILMONT, Minn. – When brothers Russ and Brian Penning started Summit Lake Livestock about 15 years ago, they did so to start the largest Penning Farms operation on their own south-east of Wilmont.

The two began by purchasing day-old bottle Holstein calves and as the business grew they renovated several vacant pigsties on the site of an uncle’s farm, added two barns to hoops on this same site and have built two more hoop barns on the farm where they grew up. up.

Brian and Garrett Penning stand in one of the barns they’ve turned into a calf barn, complete with calf crates. (Julie Buntjer / The Globe)

Today, Summit Lake Livestock continues to import day-old bottle calves, although the majority weigh 200 pounds. They also went from Holstein to the Holstein-Angus cross. Plus, they buy cattle at 600 pounds to finish off.

On the State Cattlemen’s Tour, the Pennings will showcase the pigsties they converted for livestock production.

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“The barns were at a point in their life where they needed everything,” Russ explained. Doing the job mostly on their own, they gutted the buildings, installed new electrical components and custom beams in the floors, and replaced the slats. A pair of calf barns has two different growth systems: one with open pens where calves roam free; the other with individual calf cages.

Holstein-Angus cross calves are raised in what was once a pigsty on the Summit Lake Breeding Farm near Wilmont.  (Julie Buntjer / The Globe)

Holstein-Angus cross calves are raised in what was once a pigsty on the Summit Lake Breeding Farm near Wilmont. (Julie Buntjer / The Globe)

The Pennings use two other former pigsties – 40-foot-wide curtain barns from the 1990s – for finishing cattle. On these buildings, the south walls were removed to make room for feeders and the access to the manure pit was changed. The pit is pumped out twice a year, with an exterior containment zone used to hold spring manure until it can be applied after harvest in the fall.

“If I had to do it again, I would definitely do it again,” Russ said of converting the barns to beef production. “It was a way for us to expand our existing facilities that we already had. The costs weren’t huge, but the return to the farm is more important.

The brothers, with the help of their families, bucket milk replacer to the young calves and finish the cattle with corn silage, a diet of high moisture corn, as well as grass and grass hay. straw.

Some of the Holstein-Angus cross calves are raised in a converted pigsty at Penning Farm.  (Julie Buntjer / The Globe)

Some of the Holstein-Angus cross calves are raised in a converted pigsty at Penning Farm. (Julie Buntjer / The Globe)

“We have alfalfa, but we usually sell most of it to local dairies,” Russ said.

While baby calves come from dairies in the Midwest, Summit Lake Cattle welcomes 230 200-pound calves each week from Amish farmers in Pennsylvania. With a mix of steers and heifers coming in, Russ said they split them up and keep the paddocks size at around 400 to 500 head. Since they bring in twice as much cattle as they need to keep their lots full, they sell 800 head about every eight weeks, mostly to neighboring farmers.

Those kept at finish weight are primarily marketed from Cargill in Schuyler, Neb., And DemKota in Aberdeen, SD

The Summit Lake breeding site on Cattlemen’s Tour was settled by Russ and Brian’s grandfather after WWII. Their uncle and aunt reside on the site, with the brothers each living on their own farm nearby. They are the second of three generations actively involved in farming today.

Cattle near finishing weight are pictured on slatted floors in one of the barns which has been converted from a pigsty to a cattle barn.  (Julie Buntjer / The Globe)

Cattle near finishing weight are pictured on slatted floors in one of the barns which has been converted from a pigsty to a cattle barn. (Julie Buntjer / The Globe)

Their father John and his brothers, Rick and Tom, raise and feed the cattle in partnership, and Russ and Brian are raising their children as the next generation who can continue in the business.

Russ and his wife, Melanie, have three children: Rhett, 12, Riese, 11, and Regan, 9. Meanwhile, Brian and his wife, Angela, have five children: Courtney, 21, Morgan, 19, Hunter, 14, Garrett, 13 and Jacques, 8.

“All of the kids help out with some aspect of the farm,” Russ said. “Brian’s kids help with bottle chores and calf chores and in the store. They are all getting old enough to help with raking and baling.


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Study describing the impact of dingoes on beef production published by CSIRO – News Of The Area https://brazoscattlecompany.com/study-describing-the-impact-of-dingoes-on-beef-production-published-by-csiro-news-of-the-area/ https://brazoscattlecompany.com/study-describing-the-impact-of-dingoes-on-beef-production-published-by-csiro-news-of-the-area/#respond Tue, 22 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/study-describing-the-impact-of-dingoes-on-beef-production-published-by-csiro-news-of-the-area/ A mid-coast dingo enjoying a beach walk away from the cattle. A NEW article published by CSIRO Publishing on the practice of 1080 baits to control dingoes, domestic wild dogs and their hybrids and its effectiveness on bovine production has been published. The article titled “Lethal control reduces relative abundance of dingoes but not impacts […]]]>

A mid-coast dingo enjoying a beach walk away from the cattle.

A NEW article published by CSIRO Publishing on the practice of 1080 baits to control dingoes, domestic wild dogs and their hybrids and its effectiveness on bovine production has been published.

The article titled “Lethal control reduces relative abundance of dingoes but not impacts on livestock production” aimed to assess the effectiveness of an annual bait of 1080 on dingoes and its effects in mitigating predation. and sublethal impacts on beef cattle.

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The results were collected over a period of 2.5 years and were carried out during a period considered to have had relatively good rainfall.

This study was conducted in the southern part of the Northern Territory.

Dingo abundance readings decreased immediately after a single baiting episode compared to unbaited areas.

However, the long-term impact is much less conclusive with no difference in the levels of calf damage or calf loss between the poisoned and non-toxic areas just 8 months later.

The study concluded that “the findings add to the growing body of consistent evidence that contemporary dingo control practices provide little benefit to range beef producers most of the time. “

The implications of this study are important for dingo populations and for farmers when managing their properties.

“Alternative strategies and practices to reduce the impacts of dingo mutilation and predation should be investigated using replicated and controlled field studies. “

By Marian SAMPSON


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New $ 1.5 billion beef investment vehicle targets livestock production and carbon sequestration https://brazoscattlecompany.com/new-1-5-billion-beef-investment-vehicle-targets-livestock-production-and-carbon-sequestration/ https://brazoscattlecompany.com/new-1-5-billion-beef-investment-vehicle-targets-livestock-production-and-carbon-sequestration/#respond Wed, 19 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/new-1-5-billion-beef-investment-vehicle-targets-livestock-production-and-carbon-sequestration/ CATTLE property investment manager Packhorse has launched Packhorse Pastoral Co, an agribusiness looking to raise $ 300 million in its initial move to combine livestock production and large-scale carbon sequestration. The Australian company has a five-year strategy to acquire $ 1.5 billion worth of beef properties spanning an area from west of Coffs Harbor in […]]]>

CATTLE property investment manager Packhorse has launched Packhorse Pastoral Co, an agribusiness looking to raise $ 300 million in its initial move to combine livestock production and large-scale carbon sequestration.

The Australian company has a five-year strategy to acquire $ 1.5 billion worth of beef properties spanning an area from west of Coffs Harbor in NSW north to Bundaberg in Queensland.

On the rise for investors, the company is also launching programs to sequester carbon in rejuvenated soil and generate lucrative carbon credits – a market expected to be worth $ 8.25 billion by 2027, showing a return to growth annual CAGR of 19.2pc *.

The initial offer of shares of Packhorse Pastoral Co (Australia) Pty Ltd, reserved for “sophisticated investors”, was the first step to raise the $ 1.5 billion expected over the next five years, the company said. in a press release.

Putting nature and biodiversity at the forefront

A fundamental investment commitment from a family office and early interest from institutional investors had heightened the appeal of Packhorse’s point of difference – placing nature and biodiversity at the forefront of operations, while generating consistent returns and sustainable for investors.

Supported by the performance of Packhorse’s existing private investments under management, Packhorse Pastoral Co is targeting an IRR of 8-10pcpa ** including increasing current yield and capital appreciation.

President of Packhorse Tim samway claimed the company was building the world’s leading land conservation, land restoration and beef supply chain business.

Packhorse would acquire properties under strict criteria, allowing us to meet our environmental and financial obligations through our principles of regenerative agriculture, Samway said.

“We are delighted to present to the investment community the most compelling impact investing opportunity to profitably support Mother Nature and help restore our soils, while delivering an ROI uncorrelated to the returns of others.” asset classes. We firmly believe that these two goals can be achieved in parallel, ”he said in a statement.

Samway, who also chairs $ 10 billion equity fund manager Hyperion Asset Management, stressed the importance of “sustainable investing” in today’s market.

“We are increasingly seeing demand from institutions and wholesale investors for responsible investment products. Packhorse’s in-depth knowledge in the agri-food operations and asset management industry, along with his extensive experience managing some of Australia’s largest pastoral supply chains, coupled with his fundraising ability, put us in a good position to build a ladder and become an important voice in the preservation of Australia’s rural landscape, ”he said.

“The exciting benefit for our investors is our commitment to engage in large-scale programs to sequester carbon in soils and generate carbon credits and sell them to those looking to offset their carbon emissions. “

Geoff murrell

Recruited seven months ago to lead Packhorse operations as CEO has been Geoff murrell, former Managing Director of Northern Operations of Paraway Pastoral Co of Macquarie Bank.

“Globally, it is recognized that our ecosystems are in trouble and that current agricultural practices are detrimental to soil health,” said Murrell. “In fact, around 25% of the world’s total land area has been degraded, and we feel compelled to conserve our soils.

“Regenerative agricultural methods focus on achieving biodiversity above and below ground, coupled with animal impact to replenish and protect soils. “

“In addition, regenerative methods are successful in actively removing and storing greenhouse gases currently in the atmosphere. Carbon capture and storage will play a fundamental role in reducing our greenhouse gas emissions, ”said Murrell.

Packhorse was rapidly expanding his footprint across Australia, restoring what he described as “degraded land” and adopting regenerative farming methods to replenish and protect soils and recreate an ecosystem that will benefit generations to come.

The land currently under Packhorse’s management is located in the Roma district of Queensland and the initial capital raising of $ 300 million would secure a pipeline of agricultural assets located between Coffs Harbor and Bundaberg.

VSclick here to know more about Packhorse https://packhorse.net.au/

* Fortune Business Insights, August 2020.

** Target return of 3 to 4% of cash return plus 5 to 6% of capital growth. Based on a 10 year investment period.

Source: Packhorse Pastoral Co


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Great Plains prairies, beef cattle production, rural economies facing climate variability https://brazoscattlecompany.com/great-plains-prairies-beef-cattle-production-rural-economies-facing-climate-variability/ https://brazoscattlecompany.com/great-plains-prairies-beef-cattle-production-rural-economies-facing-climate-variability/#respond Thu, 29 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/great-plains-prairies-beef-cattle-production-rural-economies-facing-climate-variability/ Newswise – Mother Nature has provided increasingly erratic precipitation for the Great Plains over the past decade, affecting grasslands, forage systems and beef production in the region – and scientists expect this to happen. trend is intensifying. Scientists and collaborators at Texas A&M AgriLife Research explored the rural economic impacts of climate variability and identified […]]]>

Newswise – Mother Nature has provided increasingly erratic precipitation for the Great Plains over the past decade, affecting grasslands, forage systems and beef production in the region – and scientists expect this to happen. trend is intensifying.

Scientists and collaborators at Texas A&M AgriLife Research explored the rural economic impacts of climate variability and identified potential future outcomes for beef cattle production in a research article titled “Future climate variability will challenge the production of beef cattle in the great plains ”, recently published in the journal Golf courses.

David Briske, Ph.D., AgriLife Research course ecologist in the Department of Conservation Ecology and Biology, Texas A&M University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Bryan-College Station, was the main author. The co-authors were John Ritten, Ph.D., University of Wyoming; Amber Campbell, Ph.D., Kansas State University; Toni Klemm, Ph.D., postdoctoral research associate at AgriLife Research; and Audrey King, Ph.D., Oklahoma State University.

The researchers concluded that the key to sustainable beef cattle production in the Great Plains is to prepare rather than respond to climate change in the region and hope their article can guide discussions and encourage future action.

Growing climate variability in the Great Plains

Climate change is often seen as a long-term gradual change in weather conditions, such as precipitation and temperature. But future weather conditions in the Great Plains may be characterized by increased variability in precipitation, or increased cases of wet or dry years and less “normal years,” Briske said.

The increased variability in rainfall will have far-reaching consequences for the region, but agriculture and rural economies could be the most vulnerable, Briske said. Cattle farms, which depend on grassland fodder for a large portion of their animals’ feed intake, could be particularly vulnerable to increased variability in rainfall.

The Great Plains contain the largest remaining tracts of grassland and 50% of the country’s beef cows, over 16 million head, representing major components of the region’s overall agricultural economy. Beef cattle production contributed $ 43 billion to state and local economies on the Great Plains in 2017.

In Texas alone, beef cattle and calves generate the largest total contribution among the state’s agricultural products – $ 8.566 billion in cash receipts alone, according to an economic impact study from Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service 2020 focused on food and fiber production.

Highest precipitation variability in the southern Great Plains

A key impact of the increased variability in rainfall is on grassland forage production which supports cow / calf production throughout the region. Researchers are examining past, present and future climate projections and the consequences that increased variability could have on sustainable beef production.

“The focus has been on the change in total annual precipitation, but what is most striking is the increase in interannual variability – the phenomenon where we go from a few years drier than normal to flooding. , then back to drought. and so on, ”Briske said.

It’s important to recognize that it’s different from just dealing with drought, he said.

“I don’t mean to be alarmist, but we want to present this message in a context of agricultural production so that the industry can prepare to offset the impact of greater climate variability on individual producers, grassland conservation and rural economies. “

Research indicates that the number of forage shortage years for the southern plains, which include Texas, Kansas, and Oklahoma, has dropped from two years per decade to three years, four months per decade, and has remained at two years. for the northern plains. The number of years of abundant forage increased from two to five years per decade on the northern plains and from two to three and a half years on the southern plains by the turn of the century.

This indicates that beef producers will experience a greater number of years where annual feed production can vary by 50%. This increases the already difficult task of balancing forage production with demand for livestock. Briske said this increasing weather variability could present sustainability issues for beef cattle operations and regions that have been successful in the past.

This variability will negatively impact the economic viability of beef cattle production and the sustainability of grasslands by creating overgrazed conditions, he said. But effective adaptations that could help cattle producers minimize the impacts require more consideration.

Further slaughter and liquidation of cattle herds during drought years and then restocking in normal or wet years creates the greatest economic hardship for beef producers, Briske said. The researchers highlighted the need for adaptations that will minimize overgrazing of prairies and the need to undergo costly destocking-restocking cycles as being the most critical.

But current climate adaptations, including appropriate stocking rates for conservative grazing, grass reserves, and water development, may be insufficient to compensate for the negative economic impacts of future rainfall variability, a t -he declares. Research suggests that beef cattle production may gradually shift from southern plains states like Texas to the central and northern plains.

For example, Briske said, the Dakotas and Nebraska gained 403,000 cows between 2010 and 2020, while Texas lost 570,000.

It’s earlier now

The researchers stressed the need to act as early as possible and integrate ideas from several sectors of society outside of agriculture to support sustainable beef production in the grasslands.

The action begins by shifting the stakeholder perspective towards a proactive rather than reactive response to severe weather events like drought and flooding, Briske said. Preparedness will require anticipating threats to the sustainability of beef cattle production in the Great Plains at both macro and micro scale.

Southern Plains beef producers were surveyed as part of this research. The majority indicated that they were aware, but uncertain, of future climate impacts, which suggested they would benefit from assistance in developing and implementing appropriate adaptations, Briske said.

Suggesting stakeholders to act now rather than wait for the crisis, he said initial conversations about the potential impacts of increasing climate variability could be led by trade groups and the beef industry. which have political weight at all levels of government. Beef and ranching industry coalitions could make lawmakers aware that changes in state and federal policies regarding sustainability in future climates should be a top priority now and in the future. .

“The key is to start planning and investing in coping strategies during the good years,” he said. “The region is likely to experience an increasing number of wet and dry years in the future. The question is whether industry and rural areas will be prepared.

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MinDA urges LGUs to lead beef production program https://brazoscattlecompany.com/minda-urges-lgus-to-lead-beef-production-program/ https://brazoscattlecompany.com/minda-urges-lgus-to-lead-beef-production-program/#respond Sun, 28 Feb 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/minda-urges-lgus-to-lead-beef-production-program/ THE CITY OF DAVAO – The Mindanao Development Authority (MinDA) urges Local Government Units (LGUs) in Mindanao, especially the populated provinces, to lead the region’s livestock production program to ensure sufficient supply of meat for their families. voters. In a statement on Sunday, MinDA secretary Emmanuel Piñol said the livestock production program, which is supported […]]]>

THE CITY OF DAVAO – The Mindanao Development Authority (MinDA) urges Local Government Units (LGUs) in Mindanao, especially the populated provinces, to lead the region’s livestock production program to ensure sufficient supply of meat for their families. voters.

In a statement on Sunday, MinDA secretary Emmanuel Piñol said the livestock production program, which is supported by the Development Bank of the Philippines (DBP) through low-interest loans, aims to establish livestock breeding and fattening projects in each of Mindanao’s 29 provinces. .

“The cattle fattening project involves the creation of feedlots where steers and cull cows from Australia or other cattle-producing countries would be fed for 100 days before being slaughtered for meat. One component of the cattle fattening project is a modern slaughterhouse that would turn fattened cattle into products ready to be marketed, ”he said.

The cattle breeding project, Piñol said, would involve upgrading local livestock stocks through artificial insemination using semen from exceptional breeds.

“This would also include purchasing heifers or cows for local breeding to increase the cattle herd in Mindanao,” he said.

Piñol said MinDA will integrate the livestock production program with its sorghum development program which will provide the necessary silage.

“Initially, the program, which should start production in two years, would aim to meet local beef needs and then gradually increase the number of cattle in the program to supply the large towns of the Visayas and Luzon”, he said. -he adds.

Piñol said Lanao del Sur, Davao del Norte, Misamis Oriental and North Cotabato have signaled their intention to join the program.

“On Tuesday March 2, I will personally present the program to Misamis Occidental Governor Philip Tan to complete the number of pilot provinces needed for the program. Each of the provinces will start with a first 1,000 steers or cull cows to be fattened, ”he added. (ANP)


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The power of a gross margin in beef production https://brazoscattlecompany.com/the-power-of-a-gross-margin-in-beef-production/ https://brazoscattlecompany.com/the-power-of-a-gross-margin-in-beef-production/#respond Wed, 23 Dec 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://brazoscattlecompany.com/the-power-of-a-gross-margin-in-beef-production/ It was 2001. I was a young man who was starting my farm from scratch. I had just started a family, led a small herd of cattle, and worked far too many hours on and off the farm. Have you heard the saying that a farmer works eight hours a day to feed your family, […]]]>

It was 2001. I was a young man who was starting my farm from scratch. I had just started a family, led a small herd of cattle, and worked far too many hours on and off the farm. Have you heard the saying that a farmer works eight hours a day to feed your family, then he works another eight hours a day to feed his? Well, that was me, except it was over eight hours from the farm. I hate this saying. It really hit me one day as I was trying to give grain in the morning and evening. I realized that I was feeding my animals four hours apart. I was working too hard and I was not moving forward. Why was I broke? Why couldn’t I make my payments?

I was desperate. I heard a rumor that there was this school called Ranching for Profit and it could transform your farm. But there was one problem – it was a weeklong school, and the tuition was $ 2,500, plus all travel, hotel and food costs. Ouch. I can’t afford this. A week off and find $ 2,500? I had a friend from college who was in the same place as me – working extremely hard but with no money. He worked off the farm and with his parents on the farm. Not only was he broke and couldn’t afford school, the farm needed him.

I decided to sell four cows and take school. My friend couldn’t come. I walked away, green as grass and swinging towards the fence to see if I could overturn that farm.

HEART STROKE ! I was so overwhelmed with information, emotion and passion. It has been an amazing week for me. That was almost 20 years ago, but I still feel the emotional overload I had from being there. I was a young man who started a family. My job was to provide for my family and I failed. I’m not too proud to say that there were a few tears that flowed that week.

Along with the course content, the networking that accompanies events like this is half the education. The people I met and the knowledge I received were worth their weight in gold. What an amazing group of people. Someone from school offered me a job setting up and running a ranch. I had another investment in the land for me and also had 300 head of cattle sent to me for custom feeding, just from the network. No one will ever tell me that networking is not worth your time at a conference or school.

There were so many ideas that I took home, but one stood out. I learned how to do a gross margin analysis. I was never taught this in school, not even in the agricultural college that I attended. It was a whole new way of seeing the farm. Imagine, do you actually plan to pay for your work on the farm?

As soon as I got home – you guessed it – I went back to work off the farm. Back to the same old routine of making a living. My friend called me and I told him how powerful the school is. The following weekend, he drove over 500 km to come and see me. He asked me to teach him what I learned. It was the best thing that could have happened to me. I had to teach what I had learned. We sat for two days and I struggled to remember what I had learned and tried to remember how the numbers all fit together. I ran into it and at the end of the second day we put his family farm into a gross margin analysis.

I still remember him sitting at the table. He let his head fall into his hands and there was silence. I didn’t know what to say, so I stayed silent. Margin told us he was LOSE $ 300 / cow. I wasn’t sure if he was crazy? Or sad? Did I do something wrong? Finally, he looked up at me and he had tears in his eyes. “I thought we were making money,” was all he said. “Honestly, I thought we were making money. I saw firsthand the power of a gross margin.

All this week after work, late at night, I ran my farm using the margin calculator and found that the cows were losing the most money to me. In my environment, the small tailor-made herd of cows that I managed gave me the best margin and my cows were losing money. I think the biggest benefit to understanding the economics of your business is that the decisions are so easy to make. His decision was to retire from the purebred business and focus on commercial grass and cattle. My decision was to focus on custom grazing and sell my cows. Different decisions but similar results. Both farms started to make money.

I would like to share with you some fantastic news. My friend transformed this farm. Over the next few years he was able to buy back 14 quarters of land that the bank had previously taken over, and within a few years he quit his non-farm job. I’m happy to say that he still has a successful farming business today. I think the gross margin analysis was the most important breakthrough my farm has ever seen. I guess if you asked my friend that was his too. I’m proud of you mate!


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